News Room

Details

Fathers’ Exercise Impacts the Health of Their Children

Many people know that a woman’s health, including her diet and exercise habits, can impact the health of her baby even before she gets pregnant. But, until recently, little was known about a father’s diet and exercise choices.

Matthew Hurt is teaching his young sons how to hit a baseball. He wants them to enjoy sports and exercising.

“I want it to be just natural for them. I don’t want it to be a chore. I want them to just want to go outside, want to be active and enjoy life to its fullest.”

Impact of exercise

A study at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center looked at the impact of fathers’ exercise habits on their offspring.

Kristin Stanford is a member of Ohio State’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Center. She co-led the study. The results showed that even moderate exercise before a baby was conceived “resulted in an improved metabolic health in their adult offspring. Essentially, it improved their glucose metabolism, decreased body weight and increased their insulin sensitivity.”

The World Health Organization says 1 in 4 adults worldwide are dangerously inactive. That increases the risk of obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes.

Inactivity also has social and economic consequences.

The research at Ohio State was done in mice. More work needs to be done to see if it applies to people as well.

“The idea would be that if you have a dad who wants to have a child, if they would exercise maybe just a month prior to conception, that would have a really dramatic effect on their child’s Life.

Poor diet? Just exercise

The researchers also found that exercise helped even with a poor diet. Sedentary mice fed a high fat diet passed along negative health issues like obesity and insulin resistance, but those effects were completely reversed by exercise.

“A high-fat diet, even mild high-fat diet, in this case it was only three weeks, changes the profile, but exercise kind of restored it back to normal.”More work needs to be done to see if the same applies to humans. But in the animal studies, exercise for the male mouse was key to the health of his offspring. (Source: VOA NEWS)

0

Related Article

Posted on: Monday, September 2, 2019 | By: crimeandmoreworld - News Desk

Guterres Visited Ebola Center in DRC

The UN chief travelled to Mangina, a rural commune in Beni territory where the first case of Ebola was detected one year ago. He met with staff working at the centre for the treatment of the Ebola virus disease

Posted on: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 | By: crimeandmoreworld - Copy Editing Desk

New Treatment of Ebola

The mortality rate for REGN-EB3 and mAb114 was 29 per cent and 34 per cent respectively, and the drugs worked even better for patients who were treated early -within three days of infection

Posted on: Saturday, July 27, 2019 | By: crimeandmoreworld - Copy Editing Desk

WHO: Low-Cost Generic Drugs Can Eliminate Hepatitis by 2030

The WHO study finds hepatitis could be eliminated as a public health threat in 67 low-and middle-income countries by 2030 for a cost of $6 billion a year or a total of nearly $60 billion. These countries account for 75 percent of the world’s population. The WHO says new hepatitis infections would be reduced by 90 percent and deaths by 65 percent

Posted on: | By: crimeandmoreworld - Copy Editing Desk

Few Countries Implementing Life-Saving Anti-Tobacco Measures

A survey found 36 countries have introduced one or more measures aimed at helping people quit smoking. Only Turkey and Brazil have implemented all of WHO’s recommended anti-tobacco measures.

Posted on: Thursday, July 18, 2019 | By: crimeandmoreworld - Copy Editing Desk

Nearly 50% of Afghans suffer mental illnesses

Half of Afghans have suffered mental illness, according to the ministry of public health

Top
1
För Any Comments/News~Story Updates/Suggestion/Story Submissions and Donations
Powered by

Privacy & Cookies: This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use.
To find out more, including how to control cookies, see here: Cookie Policy more information

Privacy & Cookies: This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use.
To find out more, including how to control cookies, see here: Cookie Policy

Close